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Insular and Anglo-Saxon Art and Thought in the Early Medieval Period

Edited by Colum Hourihane

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$35.00 | Paperback Edition
ISBN: 978-0-9837537-0-4

346 pages
8.5" × 11"
186 b&w illustrations
2011
Distributed by the Penn State Press for the Index of Christian Art, Princeton University

The Index of Christian Art: Occasional Papers

Insular and Anglo-Saxon Art and Thought in the Early Medieval Period

Edited by Colum Hourihane

Covering the arts of Ireland and England with some incursions onto mainland Europe, where the same stylistic influences are found, the terms “Insular” and “Anglo-Saxon” are two of the most problematic in medieval art history. Originally used to define the manuscripts of ninth- and tenth-century Ireland and the north of England, “Insular” is now more widely applied to include all of the media of these and earlier periods. It is a style that is closely related to the more narrowly defined Anglo-Saxon. Stretching from the sixth or seventh centuries possibly to the late eleventh century, these styles are two of the most innovative of the Middle Ages. The studies in this volume, which were undertaken by some of the most eminent scholars in the field, highlight the close interaction between the two worlds of Ireland and England in the early medieval period. Studies deal with topics as diverse as the Books of Kells and Durrow, the high cross, reliquaries, and shrines as well as issues of reception, liturgy, color, performance, and iconography.

 

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Covering the arts of Ireland and England with some incursions onto mainland Europe, where the same stylistic influences are found, the terms “Insular” and “Anglo-Saxon” are two of the most problematic in medieval art history. Originally used to define the manuscripts of ninth- and tenth-century Ireland and the north of England, “Insular” is now more widely applied to include all of the media of these and earlier periods. It is a style that is closely related to the more narrowly defined Anglo-Saxon. Stretching from the sixth or seventh centuries possibly to the late eleventh century, these styles are two of the most innovative of the Middle Ages. The studies in this volume, which were undertaken by some of the most eminent scholars in the field, highlight the close interaction between the two worlds of Ireland and England in the early medieval period. Studies deal with topics as diverse as the Books of Kells and Durrow, the high cross, reliquaries, and shrines as well as issues of reception, liturgy, color, performance, and iconography.

The contributors are Herbert R. Broderick III, Michelle P. Brown, Carol Farr, Peter Harbison, Paul Meyvaert, Lawrence Nees, Nancy Netzer, Carol Neuman de Vegvar, Éamonn Ó Carragáin, Neil O’Donoghue, Jennifer O’Reilly, Heather Pulliam, Jane Rosenthal, Michael Ryan, Ben C. Tilghman, and Benjamin Withers.

Colum Hourihane is Director of the Index of Christian Art, Princeton University.

Contents

Introduction

1. New Finds versus the Beginning of the Narrative on Insular Gospel Books

Nancy Netzer

2. Recent Trends in Dating Works of Insular art

Lawrence Nees

3. Southumbrian Book Culture: The Interface Between Insular and Anglo-Saxon

Michelle P. Brown

4. Metalwork in Ireland from the Later Seventh to the Ninth Century; A Review

Michael Ryan

5. Looking to Byzantium: Light, Color and Cloth in Insular Art

Heather Pulliam

6. Insular Chrismals and House-Shaped Shrines in the Early Middle Ages

Neil O Donoghue

7. Writing in Tongues: Mixed Scripts and Style in Insular Art

Ben C. Tilghman

8. Reclaiming the Apocalypse Majestas Panel for the Ruthwell Cross

Paul Meyvaert

9. An Irish Stroke of European Genius, Irish High Crosses and the Emperor Charles the Bald

Peter Harbison

10. High Crosses, The Sun’s Course, and Local Theologies at Kells and Monasterboice

Éamonn Ó Carragáin

11. Appropriating Victoria: Intercultural Transformations of a Visual Motif

Carol Neuman de Vegvar

12. St. John the Divine: Between Two Worlds

Jennifer O Reilly

13. Vox Ecclesiae: Performance and Insular Manuscript Art

Carol Farr

14. The Image in the Arenberg Gospels of Christ beginning to be “What He Was Not”

Jane Rosenthal

15. Satan's Mandorla: Translation, Transformation, and Interpretation in Late Anglo-Saxon England

Benjamin Withers

16. The Veil of Moses as Exegetical Image in the Illustrated Old English Hexateuch (London, BL Cotton MS Claudius B.iv)

Herbert R. Broderick III

17. The Binding of the Stonyhurst Gospel of St. John and St. John

Martin Werner